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    STUDENTS: Why we do summer reading (besides ensuring we cover all material necessary for next year and beyond)… What Research Says About Reading:

    The following points are from Reading In and Out of Schools, a publication prepared by the Educational Testing Service for the US Department of Education, and Patterns of Reading Practice, a publication of The Institute for Academic Excellence. 

    1. The amount of reading that students do for school, and do out of school are both positively related to their reading achievement.
    2.  Students who reported discussing their reading had higher average reading achievement than students who reported never having this opportunity, 
    3. When ranked according to the amount of reading they do, students in the top 5 percent read 144 times more that students in the bottom 5 percent. 

     

     

    All that is expected of you is to read the book critically. When you enter class at the beginning of the year there will be an assessment to determine the depth of your reading and the critical thinking used to connect to the author's purpose and style, themes, characters, setting, and Point of View

     

         

                
     The Great Gatsby
    by F. Scott Fitzgerald
     
     
     
    The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. First published in 1925, this quintessential novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the mysteriously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.
     

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    Part Two: Course Description (Required)

     

    It is also required that students heading into AP English Language and Composition read and note major take-aways about the curriculum of this course by accessing the Course Guide for this subject. To do so, go to apcentral.collegeboard.org, scroll over “Exam Home Pages,” click AP

    English Language and Composition, and then click “Course Description”. Or you may follow the url below to get to the AP English Lang. and Comp. Course Description.

     

    http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-english-language-and-composition-course-description.pdf

     

     

     

     

     

Last Modified on May 15, 2019